12 shows and movies to watch on Netflix before they expire in September

Tony Award-winning playwright and Oscar-nominated screenwriter John Logan created this witty Showtime series, mixing a tasty stew of Victorian-era monsters, mythology, and literary flourishes. Eva Green is a wonder – terrifying, fun, self-conscious entertaining – as a monster hunter whose adventures in late 19th century London intersect with the worlds of “Dracula”, “Frankenstein”, “The Image of Dorian Gray “and” Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, “as well as various gunmen, werewolves, and alienists. Those who know the characters and the books they inhabit will eagerly devour the references and intersections, but even newbies can easily cling to the Dark humor, intricate narratives, and the show’s copious gore.

Stream it here.

Mainstream audiences who have discovered the charismatic Hong Kong actor Tony Leung Chiu-wai through Marvel’s “Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings” would do well to queue up for this 2013 martial arts drama, one of the actor’s many collaborations with dazzling director Wong Kar-wai. Leung plays Ip Man, a master of the South Chinese kung fu style known as Wing Chun, who trained a young Bruce Lee. But Wong’s film is less of a biopic than a Lee-style adventure, filled with astonishingly photographed fight sequences and action scenes. Netflix is ​​streaming the US version of the film, which is shorter and simplified, but less impressive. Still, even in this truncated form, “The Grandmaster” is an overwhelming experience.

Stream it here.

“Get off my plane!” grunted Harrison Ford in this 1997 action show that, simply put, is “Die Hard” on the President’s plane. Ford plays President James Marshall, who is heading from Moscow to the White House when a gang of terrorists hijacks Air Force One, taking his family and staff hostage. But Marshall is a combat veteran and decides to back up his “don’t deal with terrorists” rhetoric with stocks. Director Wolfgang Petersen knows how to direct claustrophobic action (his breakthrough movie was “Das Boot”), and Ford is a sturdy anchor, retaining credibility even in the silliest moments of the script. Gary Oldman, meanwhile, is having a lot of fun, munching on a slew of scenery as the leader of the kidnappers.

Stream it here.

With the second season of this supernatural drama migrating from CBS to Paramount +, it’s not too surprising that the first year he left Netflix to join it. Katja Herbers, Mike Colter and Aasif Mandvi play three “advisers” to the Roman Catholic Church, almost like a Ghostbusters team for possessions, sent to determine the validity of such encounters. But “Evil” isn’t just another “Exorcist” scam; has an elegant pedigree, hailing from the pens of Robert and Michelle King, the team behind “The Good Wife” and “The Good Fight.” He rises for his extraordinarily intelligent dialogue and pointed characterizations, and later delivers the goods of the genre.

Stream it here.

It’s forgivable to assume that this 2008 family favorite was DreamWorks’ transparent attempt to recreate the success of “Shrek” – a computer-animated film that could start a franchise, riddled with pop culture references and built around personality. of a comic book superstar. And those assumptions are not incorrect. But “Kung Fu Panda” is enjoyed despite its unmistakable formula, mainly because of the incalculable charisma of its star, Jack Black; he is at once funny, cuddly, understanding and inspiring as a panda prone to antics who must fulfill his destiny as the “Dragon Warrior”. (The first sequel also comes out of Netflix on September 30).

Stream it here.

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